CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Housemaid (1960) a probing look at Korean social structure

Unhinged storytelling that is so incredibly intoxicating. The Housemaid is watching a Shakespearean level tragedy in slow motion, as the persona’s gradually unravel, revealing a complicated existence with the introduction of one deviant character, Lee Eun-sim (Myung-sook), that turns a family upside down. It’s bleak but not from the outset, making the turn from the … More CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Housemaid (1960) a probing look at Korean social structure

CERTIFIED WEIRD: Steve Buscemi at his best In The Soup (1992)

In The Soup is the epitome of independent filmmaking. It’s the most Jim Jarmusch film ever made while not being made by Jim Jarmusch (although he does play a small part in the film). It’s a film that’s brainstorming in the text of the script and gives way to its creative impulses by the tragic finale. It’s Steve Buscemi’s (Adolpho) greatest performance ever, as he gets a leading role in an off-beat character-focused hangout film. … More CERTIFIED WEIRD: Steve Buscemi at his best In The Soup (1992)

CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Cremator (1965) a viscous and bitterly funny romp of the Czech New Wave

The Cremator is a pure gem of the Czechoslovakian New Wave film movement. It’s a bizarrely twisted look at a cremator, who has a deep fascination with reincarnation, Tibetan monks and aryanization, that finds himself at odds with his family due to his wife and children being Jewish. … More CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Cremator (1965) a viscous and bitterly funny romp of the Czech New Wave

CERTIFIED WEIRD: Sean Baker’s Red Rocket a triumph of backwater Texas sleaziness

Sean Baker’s dedication to the lower socio-economic people of the South is what makes his films so unique. Red Rocket is the best of backwater Texas towns. The sleaziness is embedded on every line Simon Rex speaks and every action he takes. His magnetic performance as the suitcase pimp, still gleaming off his glory days in the adult film industry, is a real piece of work. Yet, he’s extraordinarily likeable for how much of a narcissistic piece of shit he really is. … More CERTIFIED WEIRD: Sean Baker’s Red Rocket a triumph of backwater Texas sleaziness

The Lost Daughter a staggering performance piece that gets lost in plot

The Lost Daughter is a nonconforming film with a structure that’s generally been reserved from male leads. Olivia Colman, one of the true great thespians of our time, tackles this role that paints her as an entirely unsympathetic figure, grappling with choosing freedom over responsibility. It’s the renegade father archetype depicted by a regretful yet honest woman that makes The Lost Daughter interesting. However, in attempting to unearth her character’s wounds, the script globs onto other characters’ lives and tells a less interesting plot, as opposed to the real story of Colman’s character.
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Licorice Pizza is the California hangout film Paul Thomas Anderson was destined to make

Paul Thomas Anderson making the film he was always destined to make in Licorice Pizza. A breezy, rambling teenage romance, exploring the eccentricities of being a California kid in the 1970s. The film succeeds by the PTA screenplay and the two leading performances. Cooper Hoffman, son of PTA’s former collaborator Philip Seymour Hoffman, is marvelous and the dynamic with Alana Haim is so alluring. Yet, the plot is nonexistent, making the character work crucial to falling in rhythm with the storytelling. 
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The Matrix: Resurrections an Intriguing Empty Shell of a Reboot

The original Matrix serves as one of those eye-opening cinematic experiences for a person my age, so my connection to the trilogy runs deep. Watching The Matrix: Revolutions (2003) in theaters was a turning point for me in the formative years, so seeing another Matrix movie released 18 years later didn’t feel real. Despite my hesitancy towards a new Matrix, considering the sequel culture of Hollywood right now, I had decently high hopes for it. And unfortunately, those hopes were dashed quickly and often by the exact fears I once held.
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CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Tragedy of Macbeth a towering avant-garde performance piece

he awe striking visual element from Bruno Delbonnel leans into the surrealism of Joel’s vision for this adaption of Macbeth. There’s an encroaching darkness in the atmosphere, spurred on by the incredible performances and harrowing sense of dread in the black. The entire cast delivers the source material to unbelievable, discerning highs.  … More CERTIFIED WEIRD: The Tragedy of Macbeth a towering avant-garde performance piece