On Golden Pond (1982) is unremarkable Oscar bait from the 1980s

Review of 1982’s On Golden Pond. The multiple Oscar winning film … More On Golden Pond (1982) is unremarkable Oscar bait from the 1980s

No Man’s Land (2001) the messy, unthinking psychology of war

Two soldiers caught in no man’s land – one Bosnian, one Serb, barely keeping the thin veil of civility held together, while the threat of grave violence sits overhead. The pressure comes and goes, as the two soldiers seek a general truce with the understanding that violence could erupt at any time. Danis Tanović understands the psychology of the soldiers, the media covering the absurd event, and the UN soldiers having to take the impossible position of peacekeeper. It paints the situation as the evil and the obscurity of war impacting all interested parties. … More No Man’s Land (2001) the messy, unthinking psychology of war

Hud (1963) explores the brazen world of American egocentrism

Martin Ritt’s adaptation of Larry McMurty’s 1961 novel Horseman, Pass By is a nearly perfect adaptation that creates an overwhelmingly powerful acting vehicle for an all-time cast. Starting with Paul Newman’s best performance, bar none, his womanizing, apathetic and lost Hud paints a picture of disturbing ambivalence. Next is the fantastic Patricia Neal (Alma) who … More Hud (1963) explores the brazen world of American egocentrism

Weird Cinema: Jacques Tati’s Debut Film Jour de fête (1949)

Jacques Tati’s debut film and it’s an absolute banger. Tati, as the unaware mailman, navigates his real home town, sliding and ducking objects, getting thrown in and out of restaurants, and above all, delivering the mail through it all. It’s incredibly funny slapstick with some of Tati’s best gags involved and one of his best characters.  … More Weird Cinema: Jacques Tati’s Debut Film Jour de fête (1949)

All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) the definitive WWI experience

The greatest film experience finds a mix of immersion, thought provocation and engagement through the senses. All Quiet on the Western Front, through the use of magnificent sound design, production design, and the rawness of the actors and writing, combines all these elements to give a taste of war that’s incredibly powerful. Adapted from Erich Maria Remarque novel, Lewis Milestone bombards the audience with the mortar fire that could collapse the bunker at any second, exploring the idealism sold to prospective soldiers to sacrifice their lives. The sound design is that of a shell-shocked soldier, trying and failing to cope with the horrifying nature of this singular experience. Every second is hell for these soldiers and All Quiet on the Western Front expresses this terror. … More All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) the definitive WWI experience

Dodes’ka-den (1970) one of Akira Kurosawa’s most endearing films

The boy conductor, riding around the junkyard on his imaginary train, is the centerpiece to all the pains, grief, and highs of living in poverty. Kurosawa shows this world in wonderfully vivid colors, painting the unfortunate with humanity and grace, while also showing the dark side. The entire ensemble delivers idiosyncratic performances and helps build the culture and ideologies of this place. One of Kurosawa’s most original and endearing films. … More Dodes’ka-den (1970) one of Akira Kurosawa’s most endearing films

The Roaring Twenties (1939) a perfect summation of how the 1930s perceived the decade

 A decade long recount of the highs and lows of a raucous era, following it all through the eyes of the archetypal young man entering adulthood in James Cagney’s portrayal. It follows him from coming home from a war to the inability to get work and how that transition often led to organized crime formulating. Especially in a time of prohibition. Cagney is fantastic, showing a real emotional side not normally associated with mobsters, and how one coped with the viscosity of the roaring twenties. Priscilla Lane and Humprhey Bogart are also great in smaller roles, as they add higher stakes to the explosive lifestyle of the 20s. The dynamics between these characters brings out the radicalism in one … More The Roaring Twenties (1939) a perfect summation of how the 1930s perceived the decade

No Time To Die (2021) a beautifully shot blockbuster lacking a purpose

The last time seeing Daniel Craig helm the Bond moniker and a nice send-off for this era of Bond. Admittedly, the Craig portrayal is one of my least favorite of the Bond actors, mainly due to the eccentricities of the other Bond’s, but he’s suave with far more intensity than say Pierce Brosnan. That said, the self-serious tone of these films is a major turnoff for me personally, as I watch Bond films for the zany villains with overstuffed evil lairs and laser weapons. The Craig era leans into the more cerebral style of storytelling, and while it worked for most, it loses all the charm it once held. … More No Time To Die (2021) a beautifully shot blockbuster lacking a purpose