No Time To Die (2021) a beautifully shot blockbuster lacking a purpose

The last time seeing Daniel Craig helm the Bond moniker and a nice send-off for this era of Bond. Admittedly, the Craig portrayal is one of my least favorite of the Bond actors, mainly due to the eccentricities of the other Bond’s, but he’s suave with far more intensity than say Pierce Brosnan. That said, the self-serious tone of these films is a major turnoff for me personally, as I watch Bond films for the zany villains with overstuffed evil lairs and laser weapons. The Craig era leans into the more cerebral style of storytelling, and while it worked for most, it loses all the charm it once held. … More No Time To Die (2021) a beautifully shot blockbuster lacking a purpose

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) is Mel Gibson relying on his worst instincts

Directed by Mel Gibson, it’s the same type of bombast that makes his other films feel all over the place, but in Hacksaw Ridge is distilled down to one character. Thankfully, Gibson got the casting right with Garfield, but the direction becomes nonsensical and they make this brave medic into a symbol rather than a person. Even his motivations are handled weirdly in the script, as his motivations are incredibly shallow and it’s hard to buy into his convictions. … More Hacksaw Ridge (2016) is Mel Gibson relying on his worst instincts

The Towering Inferno – a senseless, stupid return to the time of 1970 disaster movies

The pinnacle of awful 1970s spectacle films where the one and only attraction being the large scale cast where 95% of the budget went to the talent. It’s the awful disaster films where producers thought it was entertaining to kill off a bunch of celebrities en masse. Even if that bit of horrific black comedy appeals to you, the comedy is done in a non-specific way that doesn’t accentuate the massacre. The tone is so flat that it earnestly feels like they’re trying to tell a serious story and not one half-baked in mediocre ideas born out of the A-list cast. … More The Towering Inferno – a senseless, stupid return to the time of 1970 disaster movies

Experience the incredible music of Summer of Soul

Summer of Soul is a love story to an event that defined the shared sense of passion, respect, and talent within the Black community of New York. The music is exceptionally good. The vibes of this crowd range from general enthusiasm to down right apoplectic with the type of icons and talent involved. It’s one of those docs that unearths a piece of essential history, and even if some of the filmmaking misses the mark in telling a full bodied story, the introduction to the history wins one over. … More Experience the incredible music of Summer of Soul

Hit the Road is a painfully intimate story that slowly unravels

HIt The Road. The title implies a journey with a beginning, but not necessarily an ending. Panah Panai’s journey without an ending embodies the title, and the emotion behind it. A script with a fascinating set of character archetypes and dynamics that all play out gradually, leading these actors to special moments. The slow revealing nature of the plot, while the characters are trapped in a laboriously long car ride through the Iranian desert, permits us to spend a deeply intimate period with a family. There is a destination to their journey, but it’s often lied about or hinted at but never stated explicitly. Even at the end of the film, it’s difficult to know the reason why this experience was necessary for this family’s survival. … More Hit the Road is a painfully intimate story that slowly unravels

Words Bubble Up Like Soda Pop a nothing, repetitive teenage romance

Words Bubble Up Like Soda Pop is a film that definitely wasn’t made with a person like me in mind. It’s a film geared towards pre-teens with social anxiety and uses the overly generic trope of missed connection out of fear to keep one’s interest in this budding romance. … More Words Bubble Up Like Soda Pop a nothing, repetitive teenage romance

Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn not as fun as title suggest

enuinely surprised how much I disliked a film titled Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn but here we are. The general idea and structure around COVID restrictions, cancel culture, and the hypocrisy around society’s chaste attitudes and pseudo-purity aren’t novel and underexplored here. … More Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn not as fun as title suggest

Caleb Landry Jones is hauntingly brilliant in Justin Kurzel’s “Nitram”

Nitram is devastatingly cruel in the exploration of Australia’s first mass shooter and refreshingly honest in the horrors of this character’s worldview. Caleb Landry Jones as the dejected, irrational, and completely broken soul is on full display and the depiction of this hateful figure where this type of violent outrage feels somehow inevitable, but the direction and the performances hide the sickly underbelly with shades of his humanity and how it gets stripped from him. … More Caleb Landry Jones is hauntingly brilliant in Justin Kurzel’s “Nitram”

Maborosi is Hirokazu Kore-eda at his most observant

Grief is always a powerful emotion and many directors have approached the subject in a variety of ways. For Hirokazu Koreeda, Maborosi introduces the audience to the unexplainable element of grief and the oversevrant stylings of his filmmaking. Built as merely a passenger, rarely an active participant in the devastation of Yumiko’s (Makiko Esumi) simple life. It’s Koreeda’s first narrative feature in his career and his knack for directness shows up in his first scripted film. … More Maborosi is Hirokazu Kore-eda at his most observant